Preventive Visits & Immunizations

To keep your child healthy, it is important to bring him in for regular appointments. We recommend that you call 3 weeks in advance so you may choose the date that best fits your schedule. The table below is our recommended schedule for Preventive Visits with the associated immunizations and preventive screenings. Our immunization and screening schedule follows recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) and American Academy of Pediatrics(AAP). We believe childhood vaccinations are the most important health-promoting and disease-preventing intervention that we can provide your child. Click here to read our Vaccine Statement or to view the AAPs Refusal to Vaccinate form that includes reliable immunization resources for parents.

To learn more about a particular vaccine, simply click on it and the Vaccine Information Statement will open for you to read.  To learn more about the screenings, please review our section on preventive screenings.

After your child's 5 year visit, we recommend seeing him every year for a preventive visit.

Once your child reaches the preteen/teen years, preventive visits will include an adolescent depression screen, hemoglobin testing for anemia for girls, as well as other lab tests as indicated. Physical forms for sports participation may be completed at these visits. We think this is an important time for your maturing child to have the opportunity to ask questions about and assume more responsibility for his/her health, and we may request to talk to and examine your child alone (we will gladly provide a nurse chaperone if requested). The AAP website (link) states:

An important message for parents
Now that your son or daughter is a teenager, his or her body and feelings are changing. It's important to keep a close relationship with your teen, but this also means encouraging the ability to make healthy decisions and allowing your teen to talk alone with the doctor at each visit. This will help your teen learn about himself or herself, develop a trusting relationship, and make healthy decisions. The doctor will encourage your teen to share information wiht you, but there may be some things he or she would rather talk about initially with the doctor, and that's OK. The most important thing is that your teen is talking with a responsible adult and his or her health concerns.  www.Healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/Pages/Information-for-Teens


Child's Age Immunizations Preventive Screenings
 3-5 days    newborn metabolic screening*
 2 weeks    newborn metabolic screening*
 6-8 weeks  DTaP, Hepatitis B, Polio (Pediarix)
 Haemophilus Influenza B (HIB)
 Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV)
 Rotavirus (RV)
 
 4 months  DTaP, Hepatitis B, Polio (Pediarix)
 Haemophilus Influenza B (HIB)
 Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV)
 Rotavirus (RV)
 
 6 months  DTaP, Hepatitis B, Polio (Pediarix)
 Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV)
 Rotavirus (RV)
 
 9 months    Developmental Assessment (ASQ)
 12 months  Haemophilus Influenza B (HIB)
 Hepatitis A
 Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV)
 Hemoglobin Level*
 Lead Level
 Vision Photoscreening
 15 months  Chickenpox (Varicella)
 DTaP
 Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
 
 18 months  Hepatitis A  Developmental Assessment (ASQ)
 M-CHAT-R
 24 months    Lead Level
 M-CHAT-R
 30 months    Developmental Assessment (ASQ)
 3 years    Vision Photoscreening
 4 years  DTaP
 Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
 Polio
 Chickenpox (Varicella)
 
 5 years    Vision Photoscreening
 11-12 years  Human papillomavirus (HPV)
 Meningococcal conjugate (MCV)
 Tdap
 Adolescent Depression Screen
 16-18 years  Meningococcal conjugate (MCV)  Adolescent Depression Screen

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